A trip to Maputo & other things

As I lay on the massage table, having my brows waxed and talking with the esthetician about makeup routines, I couldn’t help but think that this was the happiest I had been in weeks. That’s probably not the most Peace Corps thing to say, but after weeks of incurable diarrhea and the death of my host pai last week, things have definitely been a little off for me recently. Today, spending a couple hours in a spa, (and spending nearly a fifth of my monthly living allowance in the process,) made me happy beyond belief. I couldn’t help but smile to myself on the walk back to the hotel, through the sun soaked streets of Maputo.

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Best 200 mets (about $3) I ever spent

Although we visited the capital city a couple of times during training, after getting used to Nampula City I had forgotten just how developed Maputo is. Since I arrived on Thursday evening, I have been walking around with my jaw literally dropped. They’ve got everything. A “Super Spar” (pictured above) that could give Super Walmart a run for their money. Indian restaurants that deliver. Grapes sold on the street corner. Coconut oil. In just a couple days, I’ve managed to spend way more than the medical per diem that I received on essentials like novelty sunglasses and a wooden carving of a bottle of my favorite brand of beer here in Mozambique.

Although my adventures in Maputo have been great, in all seriousness, the last couple weeks have been kind of rough. I find it much harder to write about serious topics so I haven’t really talked a lot about this kind of stuff. But in reality I *do not* recommend the incurable diarrhea, as I’ve lost 10+ pounds in like two weeks and have been constantly dehydrated and miserable. My host pai’s death was sudden, and I am still processing my feelings. He had been suffering from headaches for a couple months, and had been losing weight, but who thinks that someone as young and strong as he seemed can die from just headaches? I am glad that I went and visited with him three times on the week that he died, and that I was able to stay at site long enough to attend his wake and funeral, but have felt guilty enjoying my time Maputo being away from the rest of the family this week. I can’t help but wonder what is going to happen to my host mãe and sisters, now that my pai, the sole earner in the family, has died. As weird as it is being away from them right now, I can’t even image what it is going to be like when I go back and see my family. Are my little sisters still going to be carefree, playing and laughing all day? Will my mãe still be easy going, running out into the street to laugh at me riding my bike when my sisters alert her that I am coming down the path? I can’t help but feel that somehow everything has changed. My pai was the only one who really spoke Portuguese, and was always the translator between us, so I’m not even sure how I’ll really communicate with my family any more.

Time is
Too Slow for those who Wait,
Too Swift for those who Fear,
Too Long for those who Grieve,
Too Short for those who Rejoice;
But for those who Love,
Time is not.

Hours fly,
Flowers die:
New days,
New ways:
Pass by!
Love stays.

Henry Van Dyke

As our reconnect conference starts on Monday, I’ll be staying down here in the south to join their conference. I’m excited to have the unexpected opportunity to see all my southern friends! I go back to the doctor on Monday and hopefully they’ll clear me to go back home by Tuesday so I can attend PDM with my counterpart Lucia, where we will learn how to design projects and write grants. As nice as the trip has been, I do feel a little guilty about missing two weeks of school, and having to miss everything else like English and Science club. I’m ready to go return to site well rested, refreshed, and a little more beautiful!

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