End of School Year/Malaria Prevention Month Mash-Up

With one week left of classes, my students have begun to worry about their grades, and have been absolutely *begging* me for recuperação aka make up work because I am pretty dead set against the idea, and my students know it. To me, the students should have to work all semester long to pass, not just during the last few weeks, I’ve been really big on trying to teach my students responsibility, but our director has spent the last week telling us how important it is to “coordinate” with the students to give “everyone the opportunity to have a positive grade” of 50% or more. With about a quarter of my students having negative grades, I finally caved and said I would give one recuperação assignment… as October is Malaria Prevention Month they’d have to create a song and play about malaria and preform it at the daily morning announcements in front of 350 of their colleagues, 50 primary school students, and 15 or so professors.

Considering that this group of students has had negative grades on almost every exam and quiz I’ve given, I was surprised at how much they moaned and groaned at the prospect of just performing a 5-10 minute play, but after reminding them that they either could do this or fail my class and repeat the school year, they all agreed, and I was pleasantly surprised at what a great job they did!

They preformed the play in a mixture of Portuguese and Makua, so the young students from the primary school would be able to understand. In case you don’t speak either of these languages, here’s a brief summary:

A young girl goes to school, where the lesson is about malaria. Partway through the lesson, the girl starts feeling the symptoms of malaria (fever) and is rushed to the hospital where she receives a rapid malaria test that is found to be positive. When asked if she has a mosquito net, her mother replies that her father uses the net for fishing (which brings a huge laugh from the crowd as it is a really common situation here). Ultimately, her family receives a net and her parents agree that she will sleep under it in the future.

They were definitely more nervous when they preformed it in front of the audience than they were when it was just me and Kathryn the night before, but considering that Monday morning announcements usually just involve chastising the students about whatever bad behavior  they got up to over the weekend (leaving campus without permission, going out drinking, not doing their chores, breaking dress code, etc) it was a much needed break in the monotony and got the last week of classes started off on a positive note!

Advertisements

“Não tinha certeza se poderia encontrar os materiais para nosso experiencia hoje, mas tivemos sorte! Um homem em Nakhololo morreu ontem e nos deu um sistema digestivo!”

I wasn’t sure if I would be able to find the materials for our experiment today, but we had luck!  A man in Nakhololo died last night and gave us his digestive system!

IMG_20171011_090041

The 25 students who showed up to our Wednesday afternoon class stared at me blankly for a few seconds before realizing that no, I wasn’t speaking in unintelligible Portuguese, I was making a joke. They laughed indulgently and asked me where the intestines laying on the laboratory table actually came from, and I explained that I bought them from the pork butcher in town that morning.

We are approaching the end of our school year, and have started the long anticipated unit on the human body. I have been promising my students for months that when we arrived at this unit we would have many experiments and demonstrations, and with our first bodily system came our first “experiment” in which the students were able to see the organs that we had been discussing for a week.

While in America you can go online and buy an entire pig prepped for dissection for $20, things are a little different here in Moz. I went to the local pork butcher Tuesday afternoon and told him I had a special request. After explaining what that we were learning about the digestive system and I wanted to bring in some materiais didáticos (teaching materials) he laughed and asked exactly what I needed. When I told him I needed everything from the esophagus to anus and he laughed at me and translated my request into Makua for the rest of the staff to understand. He told me to come by his house at 6 am tomorrow to pick everything up.

When I arrived at his house fashionably late at 7:30, the pigs were looking much cuter than they should have. I waited around for a couple hours while they did the pre-butchery preparation, and when it came time to finally cut them open, they had me come over to explain exactly what I wanted. Starting at the end, it was pretty easy – anus, large and small intestine, stomach, all the way up to the esophagus. They were surprised to hear that the liver and pancreas were also considered part of the digestive system, and left those attached while removing the lungs, heart, and kidneys. One of the workers said that he felt like he was back in school as I explained each part and its function. I was the overexcited teacher giving a lesson that nobody there had asked for.

I left a couple hours after my arrival, my backpack filled with about 10 pounds of digestive organs (triple bagged) and only $3 poorer (what a bargen!). It was a long hot walk home, and the whole time I was wondering if it was pig organ juice or sweat running down my back #PeaceCorpsProbs

When I got home and gave the intestines a bit of a cleaning, I was pleased to see that these intestines looked almost exactly like the diagram we had been using in class. And much to my surprise, when the students gathered around the demonstration table to see the organs, they began pointing out what each part was before I even came over, no explanation necessary! Almost every single student received 100% on the quiz that followed the demonstration, in which they were assigned two organs and had to identify them on our model, and tell me the function. Crazy what can be accomplished when everyone arrives to class prepared with their homework done!

IMG_20171011_143846
The students were much more willing to be hands on with the intestines than I was

Unsurprisingly, at the end of class a few students asked me what I planned to do with the intestines. I told them that I didn’t really have any plans, as we don’t really eat too many intestines in America and neither Kathryn nor I know how to prepare them. These students decided that they didn’t need the intestines but would gladly take the liver to cook up in a stew with rice tonight for dinner.

IMG_20171011_151245

I was still left with 2 gallon ziplock bags of intestines, which my neighbors gladly took off my hands when they saw me walking home with it. They said they’d let me try a bit for dinner… although I’m not sure I’m ready to start eating my science experiments quite yet.

Changing the world, three hours per week at a time

When the school schedules were released at the beginning of the semester, the school’s pedagogical director explained that I was only given three hours to allow me time to “learn the ways of Africa.” He constantly stressed that I could request more hours at any time, which, as evidenced by the fact that I am still teaching only three hours a week, has not exactly been proven true.

I know what you’re thinking: “wait, you left everything you love in America to teach three hours a week?” Peace Corps also seems to think this is some type of issue, because every time I run into staff members on my frequent trips to Nampula, they bring up my “issues at site,” even though I can’t ever remember complaining about anything in Nakhololo to them, because when it comes down to it, I’m really living the Posh Corps life and don’t have a lot to complain about.

My completely unrestricted schedule allowes me to come up with revolutionary classroom activities such as the “Soil Competition,” we held this week, in which I unleased my students on the world in search of the most interesting soil they could find, to present to the rest of the class in hopes of winning a pack of mint knockoff Oreos.

img_20170511_164435-1-1 (2).jpg
wau, check out that solo calcário !!!

He knew learning about dirt could be so interesting???

While only having three hours per week of teaching has made motivating myself to do anything difficult, it has also given me time to work on the Peace Corps “secondary projects.” In Mozambique there are a handful of national projects that include youth groups, English Theater competitions, and Science Fair/Club. We had two English clubs going strong, but the numbers have fizzled down and we now only have one student from my original group who still regularly attends, and as it seemed kind of awkward to have an English group with one student and two teachers, I stepped back from this, as much as I enjoyed practicing English with this student.  Plus, it turns out we can’t even compete in the English Theater competition because our students have an “unfair advantage,” even though they don’t even teach English at our school.

I attended the youth group trainings in March, but kind of realized I’m not really a youth group kind of person… Which leaves me with ~*~**SCIENCE CLUB/FAIR**~*~

In January, I applied to become Nampula’s provincial science fair coordinator, and was selected along with Victoria, our nearest volunteer. This actually sounds a lot more important than it is, so far it has just involved multiple useless trips to Nampula city where (even when our counterparts show up) little gets accomplished. At least we can expense our Chinese food lunches.

Science club, on the other hand, has been probably most fulfilling project at site. I have been super lucky in that the other two science teachers at my school are both competent and super jazzed about the whole idea, and have really taken the project on as their own. More often than not, they lead the sessions while I stand in the corner smiling and nodding, which is fine by me.

The science club curriculum involves a series of 5 or so meetings and experiments designed to teach the students the scientific method, dependent and independent variables, and how to design their own project all in preparation of the national science fair. At the IFP, the first 3 weeks of the science curriculum were dedicated to pretty much teaching the same stuff, meaning we finished the curriculum in no time. With no more “official” experiments to conduct, I was over joyed when one of our students Jamal offered to show off a demonstration of his science fair project for the rest of the group. Using only ~local materials~ found in our market, he tested different types of solutions to see which would conduct electricity best to light a small LED light. It was awesome to seem him explain his use of the scientific method and apply his knowledge to a real life scenario: getting struck by lightening while swimming in the ocean. Or, more commonly, getting shocked by your electric stove while barefoot but not while wearing flip flops. His whole demonstration just made my heart happy, I was so proud of him for being able to correctly answer all the question the other students were asking him, like what his independent variable was. On Tuesday we are having a “workshop” for everyone’s projects, and I have high hopes for the rest of their experiments. They’ve been extremly secretive about what they’re actually doing, which kind of worries me, but means I’ll be very surprised on Tuesday when I finally will find out what they’ve been working on!